Photo of Bethany AllenAlthough underwater speakers have been around since the 1960’s, the technology used to make them has made some serious progress in the last few years. As the technology continues to advance, so does the demand, as hotels, resorts, casinos, amusement parks, synchronized swimming teams, and homeowners alike are installing pool speakers in order to enjoy music under the water. So if you’re considering buying underwater speakers for your own pool or offering them to customers, here are a few things you should know.

First, it is important to note that each underwater speaker covers 20 by 20 feet (400 square feet). This rule of thumb will work in almost all pools. However, for long and narrow pools (such as lap pools), it is best to place one speaker per 20 linear feet instead of square feet.

photo of speakersWith this in mind, let’s talk about spacing. The following diagrams illustrate the best ways to space the speakers in order to get maximum sound coverage in the water. For example, if your pool requires two or more speakers, it’s always best to stagger them on either side of the pool so that no two speakers directly face each other. Doing so will produce too much noise in the same areas, thus minimizing the sound coverage in other areas of the pool.

drawing of sound coverage

Now imagine this scenario. Your customer is swimming some laps, pushes off the end of the pool, and kicks in the speaker lens, which requires replacement. To avoid this, install the speakers along the sides of the pool instead of the ends. This will also maximize sound coverage. 

Keep in mind that some underwater speakers have depth requirements and some don’t, so make sure to check on that. Also, if you live in a climate where the pool freezes in the winter, you should install the speakers below the freeze line.

Bethany Allen works for Clark Synthesis, Littleton, Colo.