A 7-year-old boy from the Miami area died after being electrocuted in the family swimming pool, and authorities suspect the pool light is to blame. 

According to local sources, Calder Sloan and his brother, Caleb, were at home with their nanny of four years and her 22-year-old son, Gary. Calder and Gary jumped in the pool, and Gary felt a shock, prompting him to leap out of the pool and call for Calder to do the same. But Calder was underwater, swimming toward the pool light. 

The boy was knocked unconscious while in the water. After he was pulled out, the nanny called 911. 

According to WPLG, a neighbor, Fabian Pesantes, tied to resuscitate the boy with CPR.

“As I was touching the water, to wipe off my mouth, I was getting zapped,” Pesantes told WPLG. “As I was performing CPR on the boy I was getting zapped.”

During the investigation, the Sloan family explained they recently had work done on their pool light. According to an electrician who inspected the pool equipment, a ground wire wasn’t attached to the transformer — meaning 120 volts of electricity were sent to the pool light. 

The current corroded the light’s steel casing, and soon, water seeped in, creating an electrically-charged body of water. There's no word on whether the professional hired to work on the pool light was an experienced pool professional. 

The family is launching a foundation in honor of their son.  

source url Related:  click here How to Test a Swimming Pool Bonding Grid

Cailley Hammel is Managing Editor of AQUA Magazine.
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The way to eliminate electrocution caused by pool lights is to place a CFCI breaker in the circuit that feeds electricity to a voltage reduction transformer that in turn feeds a 12 volt pool light. The combination of the CGCI breaker together with the low voltage output transformer that feeds the 12 volt light will eliminate the possibility of becoming electrocuted from the swimming pool light. Thank you Peter Langevin.. I'm Irv Chazen 305-724-5315
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Well after all our speculations, was there a GFCI, and suggesting that it would be completely out of the ordinary not to have one, what was discovered. ???
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DISCHARGING - typo sorry
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Scott Long: A grounding rod is WRONG. You want the stray electricity ditcharging into earth at the service entrance. Most properties will only have 1 grounding rod (sometimes they will be installed at out buildings - detached barns, garages, aircraft hangers, etc.). Refer to the National Electric Code, Section 680. It addresses the manner of bonding, number of bonding points, how to bond the "earth" around a pool, bonding the pool water and the bonding requirements for above ground & fiberglass pools. NEC 250 outlines the grounding system and where the <i>grounding rods</i> get installed. Mike Holt has authored some great books that explain in laypersons terms the NEC (with tons of pictures for us dummies). Holt has a manual that outlines just NEC Section 680 for swimming pool contractors.
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Paolo is correct. The proper term is "bonding", concerning the wires from a pool ladder, rail or diving board stand.
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I would like to learn more about bonding pools. Inground: When you are using galvanized steel pool panels. 1. How many bonding points are recommended around the perimeter of the panels? 2. What size/type wire is recommended? 3. Is it recommended to share the pump and filter 6' copper rod or should the pool be bonded on a separate 6' copper rod(s). Above Ground: 1. Is it recommended to bond above ground pools. 2. How many bonding points are recommended? I find it difficult to get information on electrical safety requirements, overhead power line clearances, etc. The manufacturers simply say refer to your national and local electrical codes. The fear of a being liable somewhat prevents the information from reaching the front lines. We refer all of our customers to licensed electricians because we are not educated. However, the some of the responsibility does end up being ours. Any feed back is much appreciated. Thank You,
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"Grounding straps" connected to the ladder??? Grounding & bonding, though related are separate things. You do not "GROUND" something that is not electrically powered, you BOND them. Line voltage lighting is TOTALLY permissible under all US adopted residential and commercial building codes (IBC, IRC) and by the National Electric Code, Section 680. Europeans and many foreign countries believe that low voltage lighting is inherently safe. This is far from the truth - Low voltage lighting can be dangerous as well, if not properly installed and bonded. Even a pool WITHOUT ANY ELECTRIC LIGHTS can electrocute someone if it is not properly bonded.
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A ground attached to what transformer?
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A pool light did not kill this child - an incompetent "electrician"is at fault. Having recently taught the Electrical Unit to a class for APSP Certifed Service Technicians, I am apalled that an accidental electrocution could occur in a pool "recently worked on" by anyone claiming to be an electrician. Even a low-voltage light can be mis-installed to make it dangerous. The only way to fix stupidity is proper training and supervsion. Paul Wahler APSP - Certified Service Professional Instructor
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What a shame. Imagine for a moment losing your child to a water related accident... Now where do we go from here? I for one have already started installing low voltage lighting systems. They cost more ( Get over it )