In a surprise announcement today, APSP and NSPF said they were ending efforts aimed toward the unification promised in April of 2016. At that time, the two organizations declared that they would join together for the good of the industry, providing new focus for advocacy efforts.

Over the months since the initial declaration that the groups would merge, speculation has grown as to the shape of the new combined organization. In August the two boards hired AH, a professional services firm, to lead the unification process, and in November at PSP Expo, leaders from the NSPF and APSP joined on the same stage to reiterate their commitment to the merger.

However, today APSP and NSPF backed away from the challenge of combining two organizations, stating that although they will continue as separate entities, they will look for opportunities for collaboration.

"After reviewing the discovery information and recognizing the work and financial investment required to create one unified organization, the APSP and NSPF boards have decided to align their efforts, where both entities will still remain independent, but the collaboration and synergy between the organizations will be enhanced," their joint statement read.

APSP Board Chairman Jack Manilla and NSPF Board President G. Bruce Dunn added: “Both Boards have been diligent, transparent, and tireless in their respective efforts to create a path forward.  From the beginning of this process, the goal was to create more swimmers, more swimming pools and more hot tubs that will allow users to gain from the health benefits of swimming activity, aquatic immersion, and hydrotherapy. Although the outcome is not of one unified organization, both APSP and NSPF recognize and embrace that this is the time to create accelerated change through enhanced collaborative efforts.”

In essence, the status quo will remain. NSPF will continue to focus on healthy living through swimming while APSP’s focus will continue to be protecting the industry through government relations and standards. Both organizations will continue to offer education.

“We will continue to invest in building stronger relationships with the APSP organization and leadership with the hope that one day we will be able to complete this journey,” said Dunn. Manilla agreed adding, “A shared belief in the power of partnerships and putting our members and consumers of water at the center of everything we do is embedded in our respective cultures, and we are looking forward to collaborating on more initiatives together in 2017.”

 

 

 

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Brian: I suspect that the NSPI had a great legal team. The results do not make sense. I think that there are other factors (Known to the participants only) that affected the outcome. After the defeat, I didn't sell a diving board for ten years.
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NSPI Attorneys as well as everyone else's,were asleep @ the wheel & collectively dropped the ball.
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To judge "Standards" along with the process, without pertinent facts seems a little naive. Each one of you here on this particular blog, have the opportunity to volunteer your expertise to the ongoing development of "Minimal" building standards. They are edited & revised on a routine cycle. Any industry incapable of policing itself, will most certainly require government to do it. Please look into the process and provide your input, like the numerous other volunteers from our industry have in the past.
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I have spent much time allowing the new VS pumps standards to be rewritten because the value is not there! Why with all the valuable information available would a VS motor be required?
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My father and I built pools slightly larger than the NSPI standard. Six inches deeper, the break twelve inches farther out than necessary, and wider than the minimums. Our goal was to wrap our company the protection of the standards should a diving accident ever happen. Imagine my thoughts when we found out that they did not protect the industry.
In the case that broke the NSPI, the pool was not built to diving specifications. The builder did not install a board, because it was a bad idea. A service "Professional" later sold and installed a diving board. The bad idea became reality. The lad that was hurt was doing what he called "Suicide" dives, with his hands at his sides instead of in front of his head during the dive and the pool entry. The diver paid a high price and that was bad. The service guy that installed the board should have been shot. Instead, the NSPI was crushed. I assume because they had deep pockets. Please keep in mind, I was not there. My thoughts are from what I have read. I read a lot on this subject.

The standards existed to protect ALL builders. They were the result of discussions and thoughts of a lot of builders. If you build one pool a year or sixty, following the diving envelope was a good idea. I do not see how that hurts the small builder. I wish the standards had proved to be the protection that we all need.
I can't see how "NSPI" greed comes into this old situation.
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"I can't see how "NSPI" greed comes into this old situation." The NSPI set up the ANSI standards for spas. Watkins sat on this board and produced standards that made it impossible for other spa companies to copy hot spring spas, but Hot Spring started catching on fire when they put 240 V to their heaters. And 151 deg high limit switches to force the heater to keep working. The standard is 121 deg max. And Hot Spring did not have dual suction inlets and still does not. Greed is a horrible engineer.
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Everything I have read proved that the NSPI just rolled over on that one! Any good legal team would have it thrown out of court!
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The ASPS is the result of the NSPI being sued out of existence for their greedy nature and making standards that screw the small builder.
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The only reason APSP still exists is because manufacturers keeping funding it so they can write standards that sell their products.
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Thank goodness that both organizations will continue. This will mean that nobody loses their job and that the double overheads (rent, insurance, secretaries, advisors, lawyers, etc.) can continue. Each group will continue and have no reason for a turf war. It is great that both corporate hierarchies will continue. The bloated expenses will not effect my bottom line.
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Albert Underwood Friday, 06 January 2017
Just like big Gov. :)
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Our Associations belong to us, not big Gov. . Unification of the NSPF & APSP Members could have given you and I a much louder voice, upon battling Governmental interference in our business.
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I have seen that the standards have been developed for numerous reasons, to appease the federal government that we are doing something, even if it's wrong, also, develop a product to fix a problem, a problem that isn't necessarily there but a manufacture to fill the need nevertheless ! I get sick when I read a call for discussion!
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Sorry to hear this. In my opinion, unified leadership will lead to a stronger, more successful organization. I, for one, feel that our industry needs this to continue and grow.
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Albert Underwood Friday, 06 January 2017
Glad we have FSPA to take care of our needs in Fla.
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Thanks, Albert. We will continue to assist all pool professionals to the best of our ability. www.floridapoolpro.com.
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At about 40 years in the swimming pool industry, I have never seen such industry standards as we have been throwing out there as I do today! I say this as a plead to both groups of members to think about what some of the standards will actually do to our industry! The new administration heading to fill the federal government seats will not be as excited to regulate any industry to cause the public to spend money just to spend it! Conservation and value must go hand in hand. And requiring swimming pool owners to spend to save doesn't normally create that value! Variable speed motors instead of the right single speed, less expensive and real value motor is just one example!
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interesting!